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MRI biomarkers

Diagnosis and patient monitoring are an essential part of the treatment pathway for any disease.

As care becomes more complex and expensive, with numerous new treatment options available for many diseases, it is increasing important to be able to identify the best treatment approaches for individual patients.

This maximises the likelihood of a good outcome for each patient and allows the best use of healthcare system resources.

Provision of the best treatment options also requires constant development of new treatments, much of which occurs in the pharmaceutical industry.

Professor Geoff Parker and colleagues at The University of Manchester have dedicated almost 15 years to the development of new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods that better characterise disease status and help identify different subsets of patients with particular diseases.

The team has addressed two significant challenges via the use of advanced medical imaging techniques: the identification of effective new treatments and the targeted use of treatment for greatest patient benefit.

They have:

  • worked closely with major global pharmaceutical companies to help them determine which new medicines are likely to have the biggest impact on disease;
  • influenced MRI scanner manufacturers' development of the current generation of hospital imaging equipment;
  • covered MRI in application in a range of clinical settings including cancer, neurology, cardiology, foetal medicine and lung disease.

In 2009, Professor Parker set up a company - Bioxydyn Limited - to realise the potential of some of the new imaging technologies that have been developed at The University of Manchester.

The company is expanding the impact of these powerful imaging methods by attracting private sector investment and large-scale pharmaceutical industry engagement.

"The team has addressed two significant challenges via the use of advanced medical imaging techniques: the identification of effective new treatments and the targeted use of treatment for greatest patient benefit."

Geoff Parker / Professor of Biomedical Imaging